Aelfgar, Earl of Mercia

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Son of [[Leofric, Earl of Mercia]] (see ASC 1057) and alleged son of [[Lady Godiva]].
 
Son of [[Leofric, Earl of Mercia]] (see ASC 1057) and alleged son of [[Lady Godiva]].
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==Secondary sources==
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*NOT YET FULLY EXTRACTED! [http://content.ancestry.com/iexec/?htx=view&r=an&dbid=6892&iid=6892-1-8-9-0229&rc=1416,1259,1529,1289;475,1885,587,1914;1049,2107,1123,2137&fn=&ln=Record+Leofric&st=d&ssrc=&pid=10888 Dictionary of National Biography, "Aelfgar, Earl (d. 1062?)"]<blockquote> was the son of Leofric of Mercia and his wife Godgifu, the 'Lady Godiva' of legend.  Bitter jealousy existed between the ancient Mercian house and the new and successful family of Godwine.  When, in 1051, Godwine and his sons gathered their forces against the king and his foreign favourites, Aelfgar and Leofric were among the party which stood by Eadward at Gloucester, and on the outlawry of Harold his earldom of East Anglia was given to Aelfgar.  The new earl ruled well, and the next year, on the restoration of Godwine's house, cheerfully surrendered the government to Harold.  On the death of Godwine in 1053, the West Saxon earldom was given to Harold, and East Anglia was again committed to Aelfgar.  In 1055, at the Witenagemot held in London, Aelgfar was accused of treason, and was outlawed 'for little or no fault at all,' according to all the Chronicle writers, save one.  The Canterbury writer, however, who was a strong partisan of Harold, says that Aelfgar owned his guilt, though he did so unawares.  He fled to Ireland and engaged eighteen ships of the Northmen.  He crossed to Wales and made alliance with Gruffydd of North Wales.  With Gruffydd and a large host of Welshmen, Aelfgar and his Norse mercenaries invaded Herefordshire.
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*NOT YET FULLY EXTRACTED!

Revision as of 10:24, 15 August 2007

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